Niehoff receives $1.4 million to address one of the most pressing needs in medicine today

One of the most pressing shortages in medicine today is in the field of primary care, where many people get treatment and management of chronic diseases. A new two-year, $1.4 million grant given to the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing aims to help close the primary gap, particularly in rural and undeserved communities.

Lecturer Sherita Moses, PhD, invented and patented a new breast cancer fighting drug

For Sherita Moses, PhD, the battle against breast cancer is deeply personal.

Origin of a solar system

Loyola chemist Martina Schmeling is working with NASA to help unlock longstanding mysteries about our world

Nearly half: Loyola ranks among the nation's top 10 schools for female students in STEM

Read the results of a joint study between Emsi, a data analytics and advising firm, and <i>The Wall Street Journal</i>.

The Ethics of Care

Stritch's Mark Kuczewski, PhD, is taking on the dilemmas that health care professionals grapple with every day

A joint study is just the start of addressing the challenges military men and women face

Those difficulties—which include high rates of unemployment, homelessness, and suicide—are outlined in “The State of the American Veteran: The Chicagoland Veterans Study,” a joint survey by Loyola University Chicago and the University of Southern California.

Child's play: Two psychology professors are studying how to get children interested in STEM

Loyola psychology professors Catherine Haden, PhD, and Perla Gámez, PhD, recently received a nearly $740,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to better understand how children learn and develop an interest in the STEM fields.

Speak up, be heard, and take part in this week’s letter-writing events for the Dream Act

Loyola is launching a letter-writing campaign to encourage the passing of the Dream Act of 2017. All Loyola students are invited to send a message to their local U.S. Representative or Senator.

Education and law faculty are working together to end the “cradle-to-prison” pipeline

Finding research showing the consequences of suspensions and expulsions isn’t difficult. The role of discipline in the school-to-prison pipeline has become a national talking point for educators and legislators. There is, however, limited data showing schools what might work better.

Seeing crime in a new light

When Professor Arthur J. Lurigio (PhD ’84) was robbed at gunpoint, he started on a path to better understand victims' trauma

Dean Kevin Stevens: Anti-immigrant sentiments are affecting Quinlan’s MBA program

Last week, Kevin Stevens, dean of the Quinlan School of Business, spoke with Crain's Chicago Business about international applications to its MBA program.

In the face of tragedy, what exactly is humor’s role?

Professor Gini is the co-founder and former associate editor of Business Ethics Quarterly, the Journal of the Society for Business Ethics.

Taking the elevator to the top

A chance conversation in an elevator, along with a strong foundation in marketing research, helped Maria Handberg (JFRC Fall ’11, BA ’13) become one of the top young professionals in her field

Teaching in conversation

Héctor García Chávez is helping students expand their horizons and learn from the world around them

Loyola's dance students are taking inspiration from Joan of Arc and a legendary piece of modern art

Student dancers will showcase an original work inspired by Martha Graham’s Seraphic Dialogue at LUMA in October.

A visit to the country: To get a true picture of China, take the road less traveled

The countryside filled my window as we left the busy metropolis of Nanjing. My neck began to ache as the ride wore on, but I couldn’t stop watching the varied drama of the landscape. My friend Jacob Miller and I first traveled in China during our junior year at Loyola while studying abroad at the Beijing Center. The fall after our graduation from Loyola, we returned to China to continue searching for a full and honest picture of life there.

Two nursing alums reflect on what they learned helping those in crisis

After Hurricane Harvey ravaged Houston, recent Loyola University Chicago graduates Joshua Torrence and Alex Yang felt compelled to help the people of southeast Texas.

Alum Ken Cygan is helping give the inmates at DuPage County Jail a new lease on life

Ken Cygan (BA ’07) never planned on spending his free time volunteering with a jail ministry. That’s slightly ironic, since he’s a planning specialist.

Even as a senior, Nicole Becker is getting the most out of a strong professional network

With the help of her network, she spent the summer in Chicago as an intern at Aon, a leading global professional services firm providing a broad range of risk, retirement, and health solutions in the world. W

After battling cancer, alum Kelly LaFramboise looks back at her life's unexpected path

In 2007, LaFramboise and her husband, Jamie, packed up their lives and kids— then ages 10, 7, and 4—and made the move to Loyola, setting their family “on a whole different course,” LaFramboise says.